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2nd Grade Addition Worksheets

2nd Grade Addition Worksheets

Introduction

In the previous grade, students learned to add pairs of numbers from 1 to 10. These sums are generally called basic facts of addition. Grade 2 students begin by reviewing these basic facts and then move on to add two-digit numbers and three- digit numbers. Students will also learn to mentally add 10s and 100s to a given number.

(See all 2nd Grade Math Worksheets)

Worksheets

Basic Fact Review

The worksheets in this section provide the basis for rest of the addition work in Grade 2. Spend as much time as needed for students to master the strategies—doubles, make a ten, and relate
addition and subtraction—as these will make it easier for students to commit basic facts to memory.

Adding Doubles

Adding doubles is easy to visualize. For numbers 1 to 5, they can be modeled easily on two hands. They will be asked to solve each equation and write the answers in the blanks.

2.OA.B.2

Make a Ten

Adding a one-digit number to 10 can be done mentally. Making a ten first makes it easier to add the remaining amount. Students will practice addition skills by breaking apart the sum of a given equation and making a ten to solve. For example, 9 + 5 = 9 + ___ + ___ = 10 + ___ = 14.

2.OA.B.2

Add Three Addends

Students can apply the strategies they have learned to add 3 numbers.

2.OA.B.2

Relate Addition and Subtraction

Understanding how addition and subtraction are related cuts the number of basic facts to remember in half. Students will use what they know and practice relating addition and subtraction problems.

2.OA.B.2

Add Any Pair of Numbers Without Objects

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to know all of the addition basic facts by memory. Keep practicing this skill until students reach mastery. You can reinforce the skill by playing board games that require rolling two number cubes and finding the sum before moving along the board. You can purchase 10-sided die from game stores to give students practice with sums of all one-digit numbers.

Fluently Add Within 100

When learning the basic addition facts, students learned the make-a-ten strategy. When adding two-digit numbers, students will discover another reason why knowing 10s are helpful when adding. Students will practice their addition skills by working within 100. Activities will focus on adding with base-ten blocks, using place value, making ten ones, and relating addition to subtraction. Each set has multiple worksheets.

Using Base-Ten Blocks Without Regrouping

To begin learning how to add two-digit numbers, students use blocks. They will use basic facts to add the blocks. Then they will use what the blocks represent (ones and tens) to write the sum. If you do not have blocks, you can use packages of gum or other items that come 10 to a package. Open a couple of packs for students to use the individual sticks as ones.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Base-Ten Blocks With Regrouping

In this set of problems, the sum of the ones will be 10 or greater.
Students can “regroup” a set of 10 ones block as 1 tens block.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Make 10 Ones to Add

Since knowing when numbers sum to 10 is so important, this set of practice items focuses on students finding that 10 and a few more.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Place Value Without Regrouping

Students add without the help of blocks. This set of problems does not require regrouping.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Place Value With Regrouping

Students will practice solving addition problems using place value with these worksheets. They will be asked to break apart each number into tens and ones, and then add together to find the sum. Students will practice regrouping where needed.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Commutative Property

Students use the sum of a pair of numbers to find the sum of the same pair of numbers, but in reverse order. They will be asked to solve each equation and write their answers in the blanks.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Relationship Between Addition and Subtraction

Students will connect what they learned about addition and subtraction relationships with basic facts to sums and differences of two-digit numbers.

2.NBT.B.5, 2.NBT.B.9

Add Up to Four Two-Digit Numbers

The key to adding several numbers is focusing on one column of numbers at a time. If students need help recognizing the two columns of numbers, have them draw a line to separate the ones column from the tens column. Continue building math skills by solving equations with up to four two-digit numbers. Students will practice adding by using place value and the associative property as they work through each of the worksheets below.

 

Using Place Value

Students will use the regrouping skills they learned when adding 2 two-digit numbers to add 3 or 4 two-digit numbers.

2.NBT.B.6, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Associative Property

Sometimes the way you group numbers will make it easier to add. In this practice, students look for numbers that are easy to add mentally and group them.

2.NBT.B.6, 2.NBT.B.9

Add Within 1000

Adding 3-digit numbers requires the same skills as adding two-digit numbers. Students repeat the progression of skills starting with concrete (blocks) and pictorial representations. They learn that 100 is another helpful number when adding. The following worksheets include: working with base-ten blocks, using place value, and making tens to add. Students will practice solving equations that involve regrouping in one place and regrouping in two places.

Using Base-Ten Blocks Without Regrouping

Students use blocks representing hundreds, tens, and ones to help them add. If you do not have blocks, you can use play money–$100 bills, $10 bills, and $1 bills. Using these representations will help students learn how the sums in each column represent different values. Nine $10 bills is very different from nine $1 bills.

2.NBT.B.7, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Base-Ten Blocks With Regrouping

In this set of problems, the sum of the ones and/or tens will be 10 or greater. Students can “regroup” a set of 10 ones block as 1 tens block and a set of 10 tens blocks as 1 hundreds block.

2.NBT.B.7, 2.NBT.B.9

Make 10 Tens to Add

Students will focus on making a ten to add within 1000.

2.NBT.B.7, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Place Value Without Regrouping

Students will practice adding within 1000 using place value without regrouping. They will be asked to break apart the hundreds, tens, and ones in order to add and find a sum. For example, 257 + 301 = 500 + 50 + 8 = 558.

2.NBT.B.7, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Place Value With Regrouping in One Place

Practice adding within 1000 using place value with regrouping in one place. Students will break apart the hundreds, tens, and ones and add them together in order to find a sum.

2.NBT.B.7, 2.NBT.B.9

Using Place Value With Regrouping in Two Places

Practice adding within 1000 using place value and regrouping in two places. Break apart the hundreds, tens, and ones in order to solve.

2.NBT.B.7, 2.NBT.B.9

Mental Addition

When adding two- or three-digit numbers, you often have to add a regrouped ten or a regrouped
hundred. Knowing you can add these on by counting on one more gives students more confidence when adding columns of numbers. As students prepare for 3rd grade, it is important to know certain addition equations by memory in order to solve problems more fluently. In this group of worksheets, students will use what they have learned to practice mental addition. They will be asked to practice adding 10 or 100 to any given number up to 900.

Add 10 to a Given Number from 100 to 900

Students can easily count by 1s. Adding 10 only requires counting on one more ten to the digit in the tens column. In the worksheets below, students will add 10 to any given number between 100 and 900. They will be asked to solve the equation and write their answers in the blanks. For example, 270 + 10 = 280.

2.NBT.B.8

Add 100 to a Given Number from 100 to 900

Similar to adding 10 mentally, adding 100 only requires counting on one more hundred to the digit in the hundreds column. In the worksheets below, students will add 100 to any given number between 100 and 900. They will be asked to solve each equation and write their answers in the blanks.

2.NBT.B.8