[wpseo_breadcrumb]

1st Grade Subtraction Worksheets

1st Grade Subtraction Worksheets

1st Grade Subtraction

Students began to learn subtraction facts in Kindergarten. In Grade 1, students continue learning those facts to the point of mastering differences related to the sums within 10.

In addition to taking away, students learn that subtraction can be used to compare or to separate objects into two groups. Students are expected to master subtraction facts by the end of the year. You can use a chart similar to what you used for addition facts to keep track of what students have mastered. Students will learn how to use addition to help them subtract. When a student is stuck on a subtraction fact, ask them what the related addition fact is. Reducing subtraction to reversed addition facts significantly reduces the facts students have to hold in their memories.

(See complete 1st Grade Math Curriculum)

Worksheets

Intro to Subtraction

Students use pictures and number lines to subtract.

These lessons cover these Common Core Standards: 1.OA.C.6

Subtracting Using Pictures

Students subtract by crossing off some objects from a group.

Subtracting on a Number Line

Students count back on a number line to subtract

Action Subtraction

Subtraction can be used to solve many different problems. Students learn about subtraction by solving problems about taking from, taking apart, comparing, and counting back.

These lessons cover these Common Core Math Standards: 1.OA.A.1, 1.OA.B.5, 1.OA.B.6

Taking From

Students solve word problems about taking some from a group and finding how many are left.

Taking Apart

Students solve word problems about two groups of objects. The total is given and some of that total are used in one way while the rest are used in another way.

Comparing

Students solve word problems that involve comparing—how many more or less of one than another.

Counting Back

Students solve word problems by counting back from the total.

Mental Subtraction

Students should have mastered subtraction facts with sums up to 5 in Kindergarten. Students continue learning subtraction facts by learning strategies to help them remember differences. While only mastery of differences related to sums to 10 are expected by the end of the year, students find all differences related to addition facts to 20.

This lesson covers these Common Core Math Standards: 1.OA.A.1, 1.OA.C.6

Subtracting within 10

Students subtract from numbers 10 or less. These are differences students can compute using 10 ones blocks or using their 10 fingers.

Missing Number Differences within 10

Students find the missing number in a subtraction equation. By solving these problems, students may recognize the connection to addition facts.

Break Apart to Make 10

Students break apart a subtraction problem to make 10, then subtract from 10. For example, to subtract 13 – 4, students first subtract 3 to= make 10, then there’s 1 more left to subtract. Students do not record this with equations. This equation represents the thinking they will go through to subtract. 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9

Subtracting within 20

Students subtract numbers from 0 to 10 from numbers up to 20 with a one-digit difference.

Missing Number Differences within 20

Students find the missing number in a subtraction equation. Students may use addition facts to help them.

Fluency

Students are expected to be fluent in differences related to sums to 10 by the end of the year. This set of worksheets provides practice with a mix of these differences to help you determine if students are on track to fluency.

Critical Thinking

Students start looking critically at equations with a difference on each side of the equals sign. They determine if the equation is true, that is, if the difference of the numbers on both sides of the equals sign are the same.

Connecting Addition and Subtraction

Every addition fact can be rewritten as a subtraction fact. Knowing this relationship reduces the number of facts students have to remember. Students practice using this relationship on these worksheets.

These math lessons cover the following Common Core Math Standards: 1.OA.B.4, 1.OA.C.6, 1.OA.A.1, 1.OA.A.8

Using Addition Facts to Subtract One-Digit Numbers

Students use addition facts to solve subtraction problems. (e.g. Since 2 + 4 = 6, 6 – 4 = 2.)

Use Addition to Solve Subtraction Problems

In this set of worksheets, students will use addition to solve subtraction problems with a difference less than or equal to 10.

Connecting Addition and Subtraction Word Problems

This set of word problems is a mix with one of three related numbers unknown. The missing number could be the total or a part. Students are given an equation with a box for the unknown number. They can use either addition or subtraction to find the missing number.

Two-Digit Subtraction

Students begin to learn to subtract two-digit numbers by learning to subtract tens. Base-ten blocks are pictured with most of the problems, but it will be helpful to use actual blocks in conjunction with these worksheets. You can also remind students of the relationship between addition and subtraction.

These lessons cover the following Common Core Math Standards: 1.NBT.C.6

Subtract Tens with Models

Students subtract two multiples of 10 (e.g. 60 – 30) by using models.

Subtract Tens using Addition

Students subtract two multiples of 10 by using addition facts.

Subtract 10s

Students subtract two multiples of 10. They can draw a picture, use an addition fact, or count back by 10s.

Subtraction Word Problems

Students use their subtraction skills to solve problems related to everyday situations.

One-Digit Subtraction Word Problems

Students solve word problems that involve subtracting numbers with a one-digit difference.

Two-Digit Subtraction Word Problems

Students solve word problems that involve subtracting multiples of 10.

Addition and Subtraction Word Problems

These worksheets include a mix of addition and subtraction word problems. The key focus is for students to be able to identify how to solve the problem. If students find this challenging, have them describe what they know and what they are trying to find.