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1st Grade Addition Worksheets

1st Grade Addition Worksheets

1st Grade Addition

Students began to learn addition facts in Kindergarten. In Grade 1, students continue learning those facts to the point of mastering sums within 10 and will begin to learn to add two-digit numbers.

Students are expected to master sums of number pairs up to 10 by the end of the year. To ensure that students meet this challenge, make a chart of pairs of numbers that have a sum of 10 or less. Every day ask students to find the sum of 5 of the pairs of numbers. Make a dot next to the pair if they answer correctly and an X if they answer incorrectly. Keep asking students to find sums until they have at least 3 dots in a row.

(See all 1st Grade Math Worksheets)

Worksheets

Intro to Addition

Students use pictures and number lines to add.

These math worksheets meet the following kindergarten common core math standard: 1.OA.C.6

Adding with pictures

Students add by finding the total number of two sets of pictures.

Adding on a number line

Students count on a number line to find the sum of two one-digit numbers.

Action Addition

Addition can be used to solve many different problems. Students learn about addition by solving problems about putting together, adding to, and counting on.

These math worksheets meet the following kindergarten common core math standard: 1.OA.A.1

Put Together

Students solve word problems about putting two groups together and finding the total number.

Adding To

Students solve word problems about adding 1 or 2 more to a starting number.

Counting On

Students solve word problems that involve counting on 1 to 5 more to a starting number.

Mental Addition

Students should have mastered addition facts with sums up to 5 in Kindergarten. Students continue learning addition facts by learning strategies to help them remember sums. While only mastery of sums up to 10 are expected by the end of the year, students find sums of all one-digit numbers.

The math lessons below cover common core math standards: 1.OA.A.1, 1.OA.C.6, 1.OA.D.8

Number Bonds of 8

Students look at pairs of numbers that each have the same sum. By studying these pairs together, students begin to see relationships. These lessons include number bonds of 8.

There are 3 worksheets in this lesson.

Number Bonds of 9

Students look at pairs of numbers that each have the same sum. By studying these pairs together, students begin to see relationships. These lessons include number bonds of 9.

There are 3 worksheets in this lesson.

Number Bonds of 10

Students look at pairs of numbers that each have the same sum. By studying these pairs together, students begin to see relationships. These lessons include number bonds of 10.

There are 3 worksheets in this lesson.

Doubles

Students find the sums of doubles using numbers 5 through 10 (e.g. 5 + 5, 9 + 9, etc.). They often find these sums easier to remember.

Doubles Plus 1

Students use the doubles facts to help them find the sum of doubles plus 1 (e.g. 5 + 6, 7 + 8). Once they recognize a doubles plus 1 fact, they can simply add 1 to the related double.

Make 10

When working with number bonds, students learned the pairs of numbers that make 10. Students use this knowledge to make a 10 and then find out how many more are left. Doing so, students build a teen number.

Use What You Know

Students have learned many strategies. They will have some facts memorized. They use the facts they know to find the sum of facts they haven’t yet memorized. Any pair of numbers can be broken up into a known fact and some more. For example, if a student knows 3 + 3 = 6, the sum 3 + 5 can be broken into 3 + 3 and 2 more.

Fluency

Students are expected to be fluent in sums to 10 by the end of the year. This set of worksheets provides practice with a mix of these sums to help you determine if students are on track to fluency.

Sums to 20

Students find the sum of any two numbers from 0 to 10. They use any of the strategies they have learned.

Missing Addends

Now that students are familiar with sums of all numbers from 0 to 10, they strengthen their addition skills by finding the missing addend, or the part that when added to the given part makes the given total. This flexibility of working with sums also prepares students for subtraction facts.

Word Problems with Missing Addends

In word problem situations, students are given the total and one of the addends. They find the missing addend—the part needed to make the total.

Three-Number Word Problem on a Number Line

Students use number lines to solve word problems involving the sum of three numbers.

Three-Number Word Problems with Equations

Students use equations to solve word problems involving the sum of three numbers.

Critical Thinking

Students start looking critically at equations with a sum on each side of the equals sign. They determine if the equation is true, that is, if the sum of the numbers on both sides of the equals sign are the same.

Addition Properties

Addition properties can help students remember basic facts. They are important for students to learn now as they apply to all numbers they will compute.

Commutative Property

Students use the Commutative Property to find sums. They use a given sum to find the related sum. Understanding this property alone effectively cuts in half the number of addition facts students need to remember.

Associative Property

Students use the Associative Property to find sums of three numbers. They find the sum of one pair of numbers and then add on the remaining number.

Associative Property and Make 10

Students use the Associative Property to find sums of three numbers. They first identify the pair of numbers that make 10. Then they add on the remaining number.

Two-Digit Addition

Students gradually build skills to add two-digit numbers. Base-ten blocks are pictured with all of the problems, but it will be helpful to use actual blocks in conjunction with these worksheets. Using the blocks allows students to move the blocks as they count to make sure they have counted everything.

Add Tens

Students add two multiples of 10 (e.g. 20 + 40) by counting on tens.

Add a Ten and a One

Students add a multiple of 10 and a one-digit number. This is similar to when students found the value of a given number of tens and ones, but will be in the form of an addition problem.

10 More or 10 Less

Students find 10 more or 10 less than a given two-digit number by counting on or counting back by 1 ten.

Add on Tens

Students add a multiple of 10 to a two-digit number. Students can count on tens (e.g. For 56 + 40, think 66, 76, 86, 96; the sum is 96) pointing to the tens models as they go.

Add Two-Digit Numbers

Students add 2 two-digit numbers. This is the first time they will formally make a 10 to help them add 2-digit numbers. Students can circle 10 ones blocks (or arrange real ones blocks) to make a 10 to help them add the numbers.

Addition Word Problems

Students use their addition skills to solve problems related to everyday situations.

One-Digit Addition Word Problems

Students solve word problems that involve adding one-digit numbers.

Two-Digit Addition Word Problems

Students solve word problems that involve adding numbers with a sum up to 50.